Drug Can Reduce Risk of Breast Cancer, Study Says

Two drugs, tamoxifen and raloxifene, are already approved to prevent breast cancer but both are rarely used for that purpose, in part because they can have serious side effects like blood clots. The researchers said the new option, exemestane, does not have those side...

7 Keys to Developing a World Class Oncology Program

The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins was one of 30 oncology programs recently featured in Becker’s Hospital Review for exceptional cancer research, care and treatment. Terry Langbaum, chief administrative officer of the Kimmel Cancer...

President Obama Signs 1-Year Medicare Fee Fix

President Obama has signed into law a one-year delay of the Medicare sustainable growth rate for physician reimbursements, according to a Washington Post report.  The Senate followed the House last week in approving the legislation, which averts a 25 percent...

FDA: Avastin should not be used for breast cancer

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health authorities are recommending the blockbuster drug Avastin no longer be used to treat breast cancer, saying recent studies failed to show the drug’s original promise to help slow the disease. The Food and Drug...

(Reuters Health) – People who have participated in clinical trials and survived colon cancer are generally better at keeping up with regular cancer screening and other health recommendations, new study findings suggest.

People who have participated in clinical trials and survived colon cancer are generally better at keeping up with regular cancer screening and other health recommendations, new study findings suggest. By Alison McCook NEW YORK | Fri Nov 19, 2010 (Reuters Health)...